Rococo-a-gogo
histoireinsolite:

Mantua and petticoat of cream silk with embroidery. English, 1740s.
(from Historical Fashion in Detail)

histoireinsolite:

Mantua and petticoat of cream silk with embroidery. English, 1740s.

(from Historical Fashion in Detail)

fripperiesandfobs:

Robe a l’anglaise ca. 1760

From the Bunka Gakuen Costume Museum

ufansius:

Mantua, or Court Dress - England, circa 1740.

ufansius:

Mantua, or Court Dress - England, circa 1740.

omgthatdress:

Robe à la Française
1765
The Los Angeles County Museum of Art

omgthatdress:

Robe à la Française

1765

The Los Angeles County Museum of Art

Nature has a Baroque soul
Carlo Emilio Gadda (1893 – 1973), Italian writer and poet (via a-l-ancien-regime)
labelleotero:

Bowes Museum
Green watered silk stomacher, richly embroidered with roses, carnations  and poppies in shades of red to pink silks.  Heavy gold embroidery, of  birds and animals in Chinese style.  Lined with cream silk. Size:   Length:  40 cm;  Width:  30 cm. (across top).
Object Type: stomacher
Actual Date: c. 1740
Century: 18th century
Materials:     						    							Silk, watered,     						    							Silk,     						    							Gold Thread

The stomacher is a piece of stiff fabric, roughly the shape of a triangle, that covered the gap of the robe over stomach and chest. It was covered with fine fabric and often heavily embroidered or decorated with lace. The fronts of the robe were pinned onto it to hold them in place.  Stomachers could be boned like a corset, or even substituted with a corset, provided that the corset itself was beautifully done (though then the corset and robe would have to coordinate).

labelleotero:

Bowes Museum

Green watered silk stomacher, richly embroidered with roses, carnations and poppies in shades of red to pink silks. Heavy gold embroidery, of birds and animals in Chinese style. Lined with cream silk. Size: Length: 40 cm; Width: 30 cm. (across top).

Object Type: stomacher

Actual Date: c. 1740

Century: 18th century

Materials: Silk, watered, Silk, Gold Thread

The stomacher is a piece of stiff fabric, roughly the shape of a triangle, that covered the gap of the robe over stomach and chest. It was covered with fine fabric and often heavily embroidered or decorated with lace. The fronts of the robe were pinned onto it to hold them in place.  Stomachers could be boned like a corset, or even substituted with a corset, provided that the corset itself was beautifully done (though then the corset and robe would have to coordinate).

axiscat:

OMFG YOU GUYS HERE’S THE EPISODE

I CAN’T I CAN’T

Because why not, that’s why.

Because why not, that’s why.

Remember that rococo Jem and the Holograms picture I posted earlier?

tinywaitress:

It’s from an episode where they go back in time to Vienna.

in 1781.

And meet with Mozart.

Who asks them to call him “Wolfie”.

Just when you thought Jem couldn’t get any better.

This is the stuff my rococo dreams are made of.

This is the stuff my rococo dreams are made of.

The Robe de Cour

In case you couldn’t tell, the robe de cour (court gown) was the most formal of formal dresses.  The sleeves were often covered in rows of lace, the necklines cut more across the shoulders rather than in a strict square, unlike gowns like the francaise, and it closed in the back instead of having an open front featuring a decorative stomacher, again unlike the francaise.  

Cours still featured an open skirt, though, which was sometimes left so open as to need very little actual overskirt—the jupe then functioned as skirt proper rather than just a decorative petticoat.  The skirt would at times drape slightly over the hip/panniers, as above, or be virtually non-existent, which was often the case of British robes de cour (in a manner similar to the blue gown above).  These gowns also feature either long trains—much longer and more elaborate than in francaises—or the sort-of tails you see in the first gown, which was, again, more popular in British versions of the cour.

The Robe de Cour

In case you couldn’t tell, the robe de cour (court gown) was the most formal of formal dresses.  The sleeves were often covered in rows of lace, the necklines cut more across the shoulders rather than in a strict square, unlike gowns like the francaise, and it closed in the back instead of having an open front featuring a decorative stomacher, again unlike the francaise.  

Cours still featured an open skirt, though, which was sometimes left so open as to need very little actual overskirt—the jupe then functioned as skirt proper rather than just a decorative petticoat.  The skirt would at times drape slightly over the hip/panniers, as above, or be virtually non-existent, which was often the case of British robes de cour (in a manner similar to the blue gown above).  These gowns also feature either long trains—much longer and more elaborate than in francaises—or the sort-of tails you see in the first gown, which was, again, more popular in British versions of the cour.

prince-charming-1728:

Archduchess Maria Josepha Gabriela Johanna Antonia Anna of Austria (Vienna, 19 March 1751 – 15 October 1767). She was the daughter of Francis I, Holy Roman Emperor (1708–1765) and Maria Theresa of Austria, Holy Roman Empress (1717–1780). She died of smallpox at the age of 16 and was buried in the Imperial Crypt, Vienna, Austria.

painter: Anton Raphael Mengs (1728-1779)

date: c. 1767

location: Museo del Prado, Madrid

She was a member of the House of Hapsburg-Lorraine and also the older sister of Marie Antoinette.

tinywaitress:

Definitely having a Jem and the Holograms watching marathon today, and I don’t care. I never watched it when it was on TV (Just a wee bit before my time) and I’ve always been curious about it, so here goes.

Jem + rococo = complete sense.
Nuff said.

tinywaitress:

Definitely having a Jem and the Holograms watching marathon today, and I don’t care. I never watched it when it was on TV (Just a wee bit before my time) and I’ve always been curious about it, so here goes.

Jem + rococo = complete sense.

Nuff said.

a-l-ancien-regime:

there is a definite trend towards rococo. deal with it. 

preach it, sister!

a-l-ancien-regime:

there is a definite trend towards rococo. deal with it. 

preach it, sister!

Robe Volante

While existing a bit too early to be classified as rococo, I’ve decided to throw up a post about the robe volante because of its close relationship to the robe a la francaise.

The robe volante, according to the Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History, is the dress that was the transitional garment from the mantua/manteau to the robe a la francaise, a garment whose “unstructured silhouette…made it particularly appropriate for the display of large-scale patternings,” which practically screams damask.

Also called the contouche or sack dress (not to be confused with the francaise’s moniker as the sack-back gown), the volante featured pleats in the back, which can still be seen in francaises and piemontaises, something that was mirrored by the closed front of the gown, though without pleats.  This front eventually became more fitted along the bodice and open in front to reveal the underskirts of francaise-style gowns.  Volantes began their existence as the least formal of gowns, but gradually grew more formal as their popularity increased.